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Cape Verde

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Cape Verde, republic comprising the Cape Verde Islands, in the Atlantic Ocean, due west of the westernmost point of Africa, Cape Verde. The archipelago consists of ten islands and five islets, which are divided into windward and leeward groups. The windward, or Barlavento, group on the north includes Santo Antao, Sao Vicente, Sao Nicolau, Santa Luzia, Sal, and Boa Vista; the leeward, or Sotavento, group on the south includes Sao Tiago, Brava, Fogo, and Maio. Cape Verde has a total area of 4,033 sq km (1,557 sq mi).

Government

A new constitution promulgated in 1992 affirmed Cape Verde as a multiparty democracy, expanding on reforms begun in 1990 that introduced free and popular elections for president and parliament. Legislative power is held by the 79-member National Assembly; members are elected by the voters to five-year terms. The head of state is the president, who is also elected to a five-year term. A prime minister holds executive power and is nominated by the assembly and appointed by the president. The largest political parties are the African Party for the Independence of Cape Verde (PAICV) and the Movement for Democracy (MPD).

Sources

Cape Verde

Irwin, Aisling, and Colum Wilson. Cape Verde Islands. Globe Pequot, 1999. A detailed guide to the natural history of the islands.

Lobban, Richard A. Cape Verde: Crioulo Colony to Independent Nation. Westview, 1998. Cape Verde's complex history over five centuries, from its role in the slave trade through its years as a Portuguese colony to its struggle for national independence.

Contributors

Microsoft Encarta 2009. 1993-2008 Microsoft Corporation.

 
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