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Patterns of Economic Development

Manufacturing

Manufacturing has long been a leading economic sector of the United States. The principal concentrations of factories have been located in the urban areas of a manufacturing belt extending roughly from Boston to Chicago. Since the 1950s, however, manufacturing has expanded considerably in other parts of the country, particularly in the big cities of California and in the southeastern states. Output is extremely diversified, with emphasis on primary and fabricated metals, processed food, machinery, electronic and aerospace equipment, motor vehicles, chemicals, textiles, clothing, paper, and printed materials. Manufacturing also is a principal economic activity in Canada. Factories are situated primarily in the cities of Ontario, Quebec Province, British Columbia, and Alberta; Toronto and Montreal are the leading manufacturing centers. Canadian firms produce a wide variety of goods, especially processed food and beverages, transportation equipment, paper and other forest products, primary and fabricated metals, chemicals, and electrical and electronic equipment.

Manufacturing has become an increasingly important part of the Mexican economy since the 1940s. Although not as technologically developed as in the United States and Canada, factories in Mexico produce a broad spectrum of goods, notably chemicals, clothing, processed food, motor vehicles and motor-vehicle parts, construction materials, and electrical and electronic equipment. Mexico City is by far the leading manufacturing center, but several other cities, including Monterrey and Guadalajara, have important concentrations of factories.

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