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International Relations and Defense, Current Trends and Issues

Future presidents, legislative branches, military actions, international issues, national interests

At the beginning of the 21st century, Americans’ lives are interwoven with international issues, concerns, and events that have local effects. When the USSR collapsed in 1991 and the Cold War ended, the United States developed new foreign policy principles. Among the most important of these principles is an effort to define national interests more narrowly. The end of the Cold War has meant that the United States does not view all international controversies as necessarily requiring some response. Americans are also inclined to pursue national objectives through diplomacy and negotiations and to deploy military force only for obvious, achievable goals. They are less tolerant than they were during the Cold War of involving the U.S. military overseas if the goals are not clearly defined. Moreover as the executive and legislative branches have become more partisan, Congress is less likely to support military actions without full disclosure of information. Future presidents will be required to lay out clear reasons for their use of force.



Article key phrases:

Future presidents, legislative branches, military actions, international issues, national interests, use of force, USSR, Cold War, diplomacy, military force, negotiations, century, Congress, disclosure of information, beginning, response, United States, effort, end, concerns, events

 
 

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