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History, America in a New Age

mass consumption, cultural conflict, easy credit, overseas territories, European nations

World War I made the United States a world power. While European nations tried to recover from the war, the United States had overseas territories, access to markets, and plentiful raw materials. Formerly in debt to European investors, the United States began to lend money abroad. At home, the economy expanded. Assembly-line production, mass consumption, easy credit, and advertising characterized the 1920s. As profits soared, American zeal for reform waned, and business and government resumed their long-term affinity. But not all Americans enjoyed the rewards of prosperity. A mix of economic change, political conservatism, and cultural conflict made the 1920s a decade of contradictions.

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Article key phrases:

mass consumption, cultural conflict, easy credit, overseas territories, European nations, world power, World War, profits, Americans, debt, reform, United States, government, markets, business, access, advertising

 
 

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