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History, Beginning of the 21st Century

Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, economic recession, new realities, national character, World Trade Center

By the end of the 20th century the Cold War had ended, and the United States was riding a wave of unparalleled economic prosperity. But Americans learned at the dawn of the 21st century that they were not immune to the dangers posed by a volatile and turbulent world.

On September 11, 2001, terrorists carried out a devastating attack on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. It was the first enemy action on American soil since the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. The attack punctured forever any national illusions that the United States was invulnerable.

The country also faced an economic recession beginning in 2001 in which more than a million jobs were lost. The recession reminded the country that economic good times were not guaranteed to last forever. While new realities spawned new fears, they also revealed reserves of resilience and strength in the national character. Faced with unexpected challenges, a resourceful and increasingly diverse country showed the world that it could not be easily demoralized.

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Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, economic recession, new realities, national character, World Trade Center, American soil, Pentagon, Cold War, dangers, dawn, terrorists, Americans, New York City, century, Washington, strength, United States, end, world, jobs

 
 

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