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Foreign Policy, Vietnam War, and Watergate, The Nixon Administration

executive privilege, Bay of Pigs, covert operations, congressional approval, President Richard Nixon

Since the 1930s presidential powers had grown as presidents struggled to overcome the depression, win a world war, and avoid defeat in the Cold War. These powers continued to grow under Kennedy and Johnson. Kennedy, for instance, launched covert operations at the Bay of Pigs, and Johnson engaged the nation in war without congressional approval. President Richard Nixon wielded more power than any peacetime president, and in the early 1970s the term Imperial Presidency became linked to his administration. The term referred to a tendency to disregard the Constitution, to view politics as warfare, to act in secret, to claim executive privilege, to subvert Congress, and to rely excessively on White House aides.

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Article key phrases:

executive privilege, Bay of Pigs, covert operations, congressional approval, President Richard Nixon, warfare, Cold War, Kennedy, depression, world war, White House aides, Constitution, Johnson, tendency, presidents, defeat, secret, instance, nation, administration, politics

 
 

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