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Imperialism, Annexation of Hawaii

Liliuokalani, President Grover Cleveland, President William McKinley, American territory, Hawaiian Islands

In the 1880s a monarchy governed the Hawaiian Islands, but western powers, including the United States, Britain, and Germany, had significant influence in Hawaii’s economy and government. American business interests dominated the lucrative sugar business. Angered by U.S. domination, Hawaiian islanders in 1891 welcomed a native Hawaiian, Liliuokalani, as queen. Liliuokalani attempted to impose a new constitution that strengthened her power. American planters responded by deposing the queen in 1893. Proclaiming Hawaii independent, the Americans requested U.S. annexation. President Grover Cleveland stalled on the annexation treaty; his representative on the islands reported that native Hawaiians objected to it. Under President William McKinley, however, in 1898, Congress voted to annex the Hawaiian Islands. In 1900 Hawaii became American territory.



Article key phrases:

Liliuokalani, President Grover Cleveland, President William McKinley, American territory, Hawaiian Islands, native Hawaiians, western powers, monarchy, new constitution, Americans, domination, queen, Britain, significant influence, Congress, Germany, representative, United States, government

 
 

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