Search within this web site:

 
you are here ::

Break with Britain, Constitutional Understandings: Britain

Thomas Hutchinson, parliamentary sovereignty, British constitution, constitutional power, British officials

British officials believed that the British government—and Parliament in particular—had the constitutional power to tax and govern the American colonies. The rulers of Parliament assumed what they called parliamentary sovereignty. Parliament, they insisted, was dominant within the British constitution. Parliament was a brake against arbitrary monarchs; Parliament alone could tax or write legislation, and Parliament could not consent to divide that authority with any other body. As Thomas Hutchinson, the royal governor of Massachusetts, put it, there could be no compromise “between the supreme authority of Parliament and the total independence of the colonies. It is impossible there should be two independent legislatures in one and the same state.”



Article key phrases:

Thomas Hutchinson, parliamentary sovereignty, British constitution, constitutional power, British officials, American colonies, British government, compromise, brake, tax, state, legislation, body

 
 

Search within this web site: