Search within this web site:

 
you are here ::

Economy, Commerce and Trade

MERCOSUR, LAIA, trade deficit, Latin American countries, Regional trade

The trade balance tends to be favorable to Argentina when world demand for food is high. During a period in the early 1990s, however, an economy recovering from recession boosted demands for imports and Argentina recorded a trade deficit. Exports were worth $26.3 billion in 2000. Exports are principally meat, wheat, corn, oilseed, hides, and wool. Imports are typically machinery and equipment, chemicals, metals, fuels and lubricants, and agricultural products; in 2000 imports cost $25.1 billion. Chief purchasers of exports are the United States, Brazil, Italy, Japan, Chile, and The Netherlands; leading sources for imports are the United States, Brazil, Germany, Bolivia, Japan, Italy, and France. Regional trade with other Latin American countries is governed by the Latin American Integration Association (LAIA), of which Argentina is a member. Argentina is also a member of the Southern Cone Common Market (also known by its Spanish acronym, MERCOSUR). Founded in 1995, MERCOSUR eliminates tariffs on many goods traded between Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay.



Article key phrases:

MERCOSUR, LAIA, trade deficit, Latin American countries, Regional trade, trade balance, oilseed, recession, hides, corn, wheat, agricultural products, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, fuels, Paraguay, tariffs, meat, Brazil, metals, goods, Netherlands, Japan, demands, lubricants, chemicals, Italy, economy, Germany, machinery, United States, food, equipment, member

 
 

Search within this web site: