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Education and Culture, Literature

Ricardo Guiraldes, Leopoldo Lugones, gaucho Martin Fierro, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, Faust legend

Argentine literature, originally a derivative form of Spanish literature, took on a markedly nationalistic flavor in the 19th century. The poem Fausto (1866), by Estanislao del Campo, is a gaucho version of the Faust legend; El gaucho Martin Fierro (1872; The Departure of Martin Fierro, 1935), a narrative poem on gaucho life by Jose Hernandez, is considered by many the national epic of Argentina; and finally, the sociological essay Facundo (1845; translated 1868), by Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, is a study of how the rural life of the Argentine Pampas helped shape the national character.

Twentieth-century Argentine literature has produced the celebrated Don Segundo Sombra, Shadows on the Pampas (1926; translated 1935), a novel by Ricardo Guiraldes; Hopscotch (1963; translated 1966), a novel by Julio Cortazar; The Kiss of the Spider Woman (1976; translated 1979), a novel by Manuel Puig; and the stories of Ernesto Sabato. Eduardo Mallea, a novelist who wrote on existentialist themes, and Jorge Luis Borges, internationally renowned for his short stories, are major contemporary figures. The best-known poet is Leopoldo Lugones, who wrote both symbolist and naturalist verse.



Article key phrases:

Ricardo Guiraldes, Leopoldo Lugones, gaucho Martin Fierro, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, Faust legend, Manuel Puig, Julio Cortazar, Estanislao, Jose Hernandez, Jorge Luis Borges, narrative poem, Spider Woman, Pampas, Hopscotch, national character, Campo, rural life, short stories, Shadows, novelist, Kiss, century, study

 
 

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