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Population, Education

University of Antioquia, National University of Colombia, largest universities, Pasto, Roman Catholicism

Elementary education is free and compulsory for five years. Much effort has been devoted to eliminating illiteracy, and 97 percent of all Colombians over age 15 could read and write by 2001. Courses in Roman Catholicism are compulsory in all public schools, most of which are controlled by the Roman Catholic Church. Protestant churches maintain a number of schools, chiefly in Bogota. The national government finances secondary- and university-level schools and maintains primary schools in municipalities and departments that cannot afford to do so. In 1998-1999 some 5.1 million pupils annually attended primary schools; 3.5 million students attended secondary schools, including vocational and teacher-training institutions. In the late 1980s Colombia had about 235 institutions of higher education; total enrollment in 1996 was 644,200. Among the largest universities are the National University of Colombia (1867) in Bogota (parts of which date from the 16th century), the University of Cartagena (1827) in Cartagena, the University of Antioquia (1822) in Medellin, and the University of Narino (1827) in Pasto.



Article key phrases:

University of Antioquia, National University of Colombia, largest universities, Pasto, Roman Catholicism, Medellin, Colombians, Protestant churches, Bogota, illiteracy, public schools, Elementary education, Roman Catholic Church, compulsory, pupils, municipalities, century, percent, primary schools, secondary schools, Courses, effort, parts, students, number of schools, date, departments, years

 
 

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